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C rating is very much a non-science. There’s no real way to compare between brands, so just go off the idea that the higher the C value, the better. If you want to do it a little more mathematically (though it still won’t be completely accurate), find out the maximum current draw of each of your motors and other electronics, add them up and then add a bit (...


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The capacity and C-rating don't tell you how long the battery will last, just how quickly you could discharge it if you really wanted to do it as fast as possible. It's perhaps analogous to the top speed of a car - just because your car can reach 120mph doesn't mean that a journey of 120miles will take an hour. Most of the time you'll never reach that top ...


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If you know the current draw of your aircraft - which you can either calculate by adding each component’s current requirement, or measure with an ammeter - you can estimate the flight time for a given mAh rating with the following formula: $$Endurance = \frac{ 0.8 * Ah }{ AverageAmpsDraw } * 60 $$ [source] Note - if your battery is labelled in mAh, divide by ...


1

C ratings vary between brands, so it's hard to use it to compare batteries. While it defines the current the battery can provide, there's no standard for whether it means you can regularly fly at this level, use it for a 'short' burst (whatever that means) or whether the battery can manage that current briefly but will over-heat and never do it again. If ...


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