20

You should dispose of them. A LiPo battery has three parts: the anode (negative plate), the cathode (positive plate), and electrolyte (sandwiched in between the two plates). Electricity is formed by electrons moving from the cathode to the anode through the electrolyte (which helps the electrons flow). The electrolyte decomposes over time, which results in ...


12

The risk of a puffy battery exploding during storage is still comparatively low, you shouldn't underestimate it however. During charging the risk of explosion is at its peak. This is also the reason why you charge your batteries slower than you discharge them (i.e. to lower the risk of puffing and explosions, as well as to keep wear and tear low). During use,...


11

It depends on what kind of stability you're after. Nicolas Petit wrote a paper on this several years ago, the graphics below are taken from Pages 4 and 5. The summary is that a higher CG is better for x-y position stability, a lower CG is better for speed stability. Background Before we begin, let's assume we're only talking about a drone flying purely ...


10

There's no magic technology, it's just a difference in design goals. FPV drones are designed for speed, performance and robustness, DJI drones are designed for duration and carrying a gimbled camera. Larger, slower turning rotors are more efficient at producing lift but have a lower top speed. That's why helicopters can hover and propeller planes with the ...


9

The C rating is a multiplier that dictates discharge. You can figure out the maximum theoretical discharge by multiplying the C rating by the capacity. For example an 80C, 1300mAh LiPo can output 80*1.3 = 104 Amps. There is no consensus as far as I am aware as to what the letter C stands for. It is worth noting that C rating is dubious - comparing the C ...


9

They don't necessarily, however a given amount of power will be required to rotate a motor at a certain RPM with a given propeller. kV, the voltage constant of a motor, is the maximum RPM it can turn at per volt of power supplied. Example: A 4S (15V to make math easy) battery will turn a 2000kV motor at 30,000RPM (with no load, inefficiencies, etc) a 6S (...


8

Many people choose to use Lithium Ion batteries on long range builds. They have a very large capacity and I have seen them give in excess of 20 minutes of flight on a quadcopter. The reason that they aren’t often used for other purposes is that their current output is less than LiPo batteries. This means that whilst they are good for long range flight, ...


8

I start my landing approach when the average cell voltage reaches below 3.5V on a stable flight (not counting voltage dips on short, aggressive maneuvers). At that point, you should still have enough authority to land safely. You can go somewhat lower without damaging the cells, but at that point, the voltage curve starts to be very steep and it is ...


8

"Puffed" batteries are both more and less dangerous. I am drawing from over 10,000 FPV flights where I beat the mortal sh*t out of lipos and also from over 3000 battery charges I have logged and analyzed (I built an app for that). I read the other comment and that person knows their chemistry. I will try to balance that information with real world ...


7

Assuming that you ignore all of the warning signs that your battery is low, while also assuming that you can completely deplete the voltage in your battery, the drone will ultimately reach a point where it is still providing power for the motors to spin the props, but the props won't provide enough lift to keep the drone in the air. The drone will start to ...


7

I have found that landing based on voltage is inaccurate. For example, if you look at the voltage in the OSD while you have the stick at full throttle, the Voltage will be lower than if you had it at half throttle. So, do you land any time full throttle goes down to 3.2V/cell, or when you are at half throttle and 3.2V/cell? Instead of relying on voltage ...


7

When looking for a battery, there are a number of factors to consider: the voltage (or S rating), the capacity, the C rating, the type of connector, and the weight: Voltage You will often see batteries having an ‘S’ rating on them, for example 6S or 4S. This is the number of cells, which directly impacts the voltage output of the battery. Just to be clear, I ...


6

I'd watch out for several factors: 1. Weight Drop any additional weight that you don't absolutely need for functioning. This may mean downsizing to smaller motors, which obviously means that you have to balance weight vs. power; you may be able to get your flight time much longer but at the expense of speed. 2. Battery Obviously the more juice you got, the ...


6

Batteries in series = add the voltages, ie two 3S 1300 30C packs becomes 6s 1300 30C. Batteries in parallel = add the capacities, as above you get 3S 2600 60C. There's no particular pros or cons for either, many larger commercial drones use combinations of packs in series and parallel to get the power source they need. For smaller quads though the ...


6

The advantage of running at higher voltage is that you can use thinner wires and lower current (i.e. cheaper) ESCs, as power lost to resistance is proportional to current (squared) and not voltage. Another reason can be to reach higher prop RPM when you can't find motors with sufficiently high kV, or merely want to continue using the motors you already have....


6

Short answer. Buy a new battery. I heavily researched this and although there may be another solution I will share my experience. The Mavic batteries have complex circuitry in them to maintain stability and longevity. This is partly why the Mavic charger will not revive the battery. Is there a way to manually charge it? Well the answer is yes and no. The ...


5

Li-Ion batteries are problematic because they do not deliver the currents needed for FPV flying. Take a look at this diagram: https://batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/discharge_characteristics_li It tells you that the specific 3000mAh cell tested there loses around 30% of its capacity when discharged at 2C, which corresponds to around 6A, which is not ...


5

Also take a look at LiFePO/LiFe chemistry batteries. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lithium_iron_phosphate_battery Some advantages are: More capacity per gram, meaning lighter weight 1,500 - 2,000 cycles More stable chemistry, still dangerous but less volatile than Li-Po Almost no "self discharge", ready to go even weeks after charging Superior voltage ...


5

I couldn't find manual or just the specifications for this exact drone, but from what you wrote and what I see on the images it uses 1-Cell batteries charged with some USB adapter. You didn't specify which USB power-bank you have or which power adapter you use to charge from the mains. I assume it's some-kind of phone charger. These days phone chargers ...


5

You may need new batteries. When a LiPo battery fully discharges, thin whiskers of lithium metal form between the plates of the battery. Attempting to recharge the battery will cause these whiskers to overheat, which may cause the battery to catch fire or explode. Commercial batteries from reputable manufacturers have self-monitoring circuitry that will ...


5

As far as I know, it doesn’t make too much of a difference in regards to flight stability because of something called the Drone Pendulum Fallacy, which describes how the drone rotates about the centre of mass, not from the point at which the thrust is created as illustrated below in the photo from the Drone Pendulum Fallacy website: In my experience, it may ...


5

This question seems to be quite the debate in many places. However, the general consensus falls between 3.7 and 3.85v per cell. You can find a similar inquiry here: Storing at 3.7 or 3.85v and here: LiPo storage voltage It seems that generally, the difference between storage charging to 3.7v, 3.8v, or 3.85v is negligible for most people. However, I would ...


5

All LiPo batteries face a process called electrolyte decomposition. This means that all LiPo batteries will produce oxygen, some carbon dioxide, and some carbon monoxide through normal use. This process, however, is greatly sped up when certain things happen to a LiPo. These are the things that will cause noticeable "puffiness" in LiPo batteries: Over-...


5

If you're up for it, the fix you're looking for is to repair the connector with a new housing and new crimps (if the current ones are broken). Joshua Bardwell has an excellent YouTube video documenting how to do this, but I'll summarize here. Most LiPo balance leads are terminated with the JST-XH connector: (cit.) In the above picture, the balance lead ...


5

This is a good question. In short, While DJI drones certainly have a lot of engineering and design put into them, the way they achieve long flight times is no secret. The DJI drones' long flight times are largely due to the high capacity batteries, motors, and propellers used. Although, there are many smaller things that also affect flight times. Probably ...


4

The primary answer has to do with the fact that the torque constant (Kt) is proportional to the velocity constant (Kv) of the motor. That means the amount of power it costs to generate torque increase as Kv increases. A low torque constant means that less power is used to create torque, and a high torque constant means more power is used. For more ...


4

Most low-end aircraft use small LiPo batteries (lithium polymer batteries). If you want to find a replacement battery you can look at the voltage and capacity of the original battery and purchase a similar one. For example, if the low-end aircraft used a 100mah, 3.7v LiPo battery, you could go to anywhere that sells various batteries such as Amazon or hobby ...


4

All of the things you mentioned will affect flight time. Here is a synopsis: Batteries The batteries you use will have a very large impact. Firstly, your battery chemistry. Li-ion generally has a larger capacity for the same weight but can provide a lower current. This means that if you are doing slow or cinematic flying, it is worth looking at lithium ion ...


4

Your questions are challenging to answer because (my opinion) I think there is a lot more that goes into a batteries longevity than voltage staying between a certain threshold. In addition to keeping the voltage in specified ranges, the following also apply. Do you fly in hot or cold or humid conditions? Do you fly hard and fast all the time where your ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible