7

Theoretically the pitch of a prop is supposed to be the distance it would move in a full rotation (in an ideal world). As most modern props vary pitch along their length, a single number is almost impossible to measure. Manufacturers tend to give a number which is an indication of how the user would expect the prop to perform. Most propellers will work on ...


3

The key here is to understand pitch speed. The pitch of a prop is how far it will advance in one rotation if there's no slip, so a 5" pitch prop spinning at 15,000rpm will advance 75,000 inches per minute, or about 70mph. That means that when your plane reaches 70mph, the prop cannot produce any thrust. Now, exactly how much thrust is required to reach ...


3

There is a method for measuring on this page (Wayback Machine link); but, it might be a bit fiddly to get accurate measurements for small propellers as your margins of error become more significant. His site copyright notice prohibits quoting material, so I will summarise: Measure 75% along one blade, from the centre of the hub to the blade tip At this ...


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