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4

I'm afraid it's not that simple. As you mention, planes can fly with a fairly low thrust to weight ratio. Obviously gliders can fly with no power at all, so there's no critical lower-limit. The other issue is that pitch-speed is important - the prop needs to be producing thrust when the plane is moving, not stationary. Measuring static thrust only tells you ...


4

The flight you describe is 100% illegal in the US requiring 107/commercial license + BVLOS waiver. BVLOS waivers are very rare, 61 issued searching the DB for "107.31" here: https://www.faa.gov/uas/commercial_operators/part_107_waivers/waivers_issued/. The rules are similar in most countries. Your budget is off by a zero as well. Depending on ...


4

There are a lot variables when it comes to building your own drone, so there will be a variety of motor sizes and Kvs that will work. I think the recommended motor size for the ZD550 is 3508 (like this motor) but that doesn't mean you can't use something different, like a 2814 motor, because a 2814 is fairly similar in stator volume to a 3508. This answer ...


3

There's quite a good summary of the rules on the website of the federal transport department (BMVI): https://www.bmvi.de/SharedDocs/DE/Publikationen/LF/flyer-die-neue-drohnen-verordnung.pdf?__blob=publicationFile It appears, that there are these restrictions: For everything < 250g no additional restrictions apply. It's still not allowed to fly at ...


3

Under normal conditions operating on the arms of a multirotor, ESC temperature should be well-controlled by the airflow passing over them from the propeller exhaust. It isn't a good sign that your ESCs are reaching dramatically higher temperatures like 70° C, given that you should be expecting to see ~30-40° C on a regular basis. One of three things is ...


3

I've heard that you want to keep your battery weight no heavier than 1/3 your drone weight.


2

70°C doesn't strike me as "too hot" for a power electronics device. By looking at the new generation of Mosfets used in ESC, I see junction to case thermal resistances around 51°C/W (°C per "thermal" watts) and Rdson around 2.9mOhms. With some ESCs specified for 40Amps max current, you could have with conductions losses only (so not ...


2

I don’t think there are diminishing returns, if the propeller+motor+controller efficiency stays the same regardless of overall weight. Imagine a drone where all the weight is in the battery and the motors have just enough power to hover the drone. Double the battery and you’ll double the capacity but you’ll also double the weight (and required power output ...


1

This question did not tell us if you are investigating only one change, the battery capacity, to an existing commercial quad, or whether you are designing a new custom quad that is not yet built. Trial and error methods such as adding weight to the current quad may be easy as suggested by @Drones and Whatnot. And I would refine this test method by looking at ...


1

If you're like me and don't want to calculate: stay under 50% of your drones whole weight. Probieren geht über studieren ;) - Trying helps more than calculating


1

Short of very complicated maths, here is what I would do, and may very well help you: You need to know the specifications of your motor - how much power do they consume for a given amount of thrust? You can find this out either by looking at the spec sheet, or I would just add masses in 25g increments and take a look at the black box recording. Once you ...


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