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22

Short answer: Yes, this is very much true. The VTX sends out radio-frequency (RF) energy through the antenna connector and pigtail, and if nothing (or the wrong thing) is connected at the other end, all the energy gets reflected back and could damage your VTX (or just heat it up). Long answer: At high frequencies a thing called "impedance matching" becomes ...


10

These four wires are most likely a USB connection, red and black are power, and the other two are USB data. That means you can't use it neither with today's analog gear, like the VTX that you linked to (as it requires an oldschool analog TV signal), nor any of the new and shiny digital FPV systems, like the DJI system (as they use their own proprietary ...


9

Your VTX is a high-power RF transmitter. When operating with an antenna, the RF power of the transmitter is radiated out through the antenna. When the antenna is missing, the RF power is reflected from an unterminated antenna port back into the transmitter. This reflected RF energy will be dissipated as heat (best case scenario), or damage/destroy your ...


7

You have a few options. One is to switch to a digital video system such as the fat shark bytefrost and do something like this to convert the video to a format compatible with your laptop. Essentially the above link documents how to convert a digital FPV feed into your laptop for doing low latency video calling, but you don't have to do the video calling part....


5

This looks like a typical USB pin connection: +5V, Data- (white), Data+ (green) and Ground. This camera uses a digital signal. Sorry, but it can not be used with a analog video transmitter.


4

This is not possible, at least directly. Although the two technologies use the same frequency range, they are very different communication protocols. A possible solution would be to buy a compatible video receiver (which might be the goggles) which has a video output - typically composite, for analogue systems - and a USB video capture card for your laptop. ...


4

The easiest way would be to use the sliders or the rotary knobs on a reasonably advanced transmitter - although it might not feel natural and the pilot would be busy flying. Alternately you could plug another transmitter in via the buddy box port, and map two channels from the sticks on the 'student' transmitter to a couple of spare channels on the 'master'. ...


3

Simpler and cheaper: No, it looks like a digital camera that needs to be connected over USB. This is not compatible with analog video transmitters. (If you want to save a bit of money look for some tiny whoop all-in-one cam and vtx combos. Those are very cheap with reasonable performance.) If you feel adventurous: You can get a Raspberry Pi, Wifi dongles ...


3

I'm going to assume that you don't need your videos to be stabilised realtime. In this case you need image stabilisation software. I'm not an expert in this field particularly, so I'll copy the most relevant answers on this reddit thread. If it's a smoothing stabilisation like this, you can use VirtualDub and Deshaker (Tutorial), Ffmpeg (Tutorial) ...


3

It all depends on what Flight Controller you are using and how you want to control the gimbal. Gimbals in your links use Storm32 firmware which is very versatile. It can be contolled using knobs on your remote controller, MAVLink messages or their own serial protocol. I use a gimbal from your first link which is controlled by a stand alone Windows ...


3

It is a totally different communications protocol than the 5.8GHz wifi your laptop supports but there are devices for under $30 that let you receive the video on an android phone or a windows laptop such as Skydroid 150CH. I'm not recommending any particular product but you're basically just looking for a USB 5.8GHz FPV Video receiver. Without buying an ...


1

Given that the drone camera is a cheap model from China, I think it's entirely possible that the camera modules is broken and could be outputting incorrectly terminated .avi files. In earlier comments, you explain that no files are created when a known-good SD card is used to record video with the drone. My prior experience with camera modules for cheap ...


1

If this is the S49 you were posting about yesterday, I don’t think you will be able to stop this motion. To maintain your position, you constantly need to pitch and roll to fight changing wind conditions. As your drone has a fixed camera, the camera will also have to pitch and roll as well, creating the unwanted motion. If the lifting capacity is great ...


1

A hovering multirotor generates a lot of turbulance, which can result in a bumpy hover. Gimbals are great at smoothing out pitch and roll, but not vertical or lateral movements. One option could be to turn off your altitude hold during the shot. The drone will move, yes, but instead of fighting itself to hold in position (causing a wobbly video) it is more ...


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