11

Probably the easiest way to get started building planes these days is with foam board models, such as those popularised by FliteTest. Foam board is a 5mm thick non-beaded polystyrene foam sheet with a layer of paper on either side for added strength. You can buy sheets from craft stores for a dollar or two. It's easy to cut with a sharp knife (small box ...


10

When choosing an FPV camera, there are several things that you need to look out for: Sensor Technology Most modern FPV cameras use a CMOS sensor. These are digital sensors that generally tend to have a higher resolution (measured in TVL or TeleVision Lines) than the alternative, which is CCD analogue sensors. Pretty much every modern FPV camera uses CMOS ...


10

Okay, as someone who has just recently passed through this stage, here's my take on it. Almost all of the considerations below stem from the maxim that the best drone for you is one that you will fly the most. Both progression and enjoyment in this hobby (and many other hobbies as well) are directly linked to how much time you spend doing it. Whenever you're ...


10

Among open-source options, Emuflight, INav & Ardupilot (different focus) Butterflight (mostly defunct), Raceflight (mostly defunct). There is still Cleanflight and Baseflight, which are the shared lineage for Betaflight, Emu, Butr, and others. Of these, EMU has an EKF (Enhanced Kalman Filter) variant of filtering, and also in older releases captures a ...


9

There are several factors that are important for what FPV goggles are right for you: Type The first thing you’ll notice is that there are two main types of FPV goggles: slimline and box. Slimline goggles are usually more expensive, but they are also lighter and many people find them to be more comfortable. Their screens are also smaller, which means that ...


8

ESCs loaded with recent versions of BLHeli (BLHELI_S and BLHELI_32) will support reversible motor direction, either through Dshot commands (obviously only supported when using Dshot signaling) or with zero-throttle centered around the middle throttle position, 1500µs (supports Oneshot/Multishot in addition to Dshot). These modes can be set up in the BLHELI ...


8

let me clarify a few things that may help you decide on direction, if any, to take. Your question is not really something anyone can objectively answer because you need to consider what your level of dedication to FPV is first. And of course rand loyalty is nothing short of a cult like relationship (#kiss) Off the shelf "racing drones" don't exist....


7

I don't know about all the cameras, but here is my opinion. If you want the best video quality you can get today and not be too heavy for a 5" FPV drone, then you want the GoPro Hero 8. That will obviously change quickly if something better comes along. The Hero 8 also has great stability with Hypersmooth or you can opt to use ReelSteady Go with it. ...


7

An important first step to take when getting into drones is learning to fly them. The very first drone I would recommend to someone is a cheap drone that can be used to learn to fly. It can be disheartening to buy an expensive drone only to crash it and have lost hundreds or thousands of dollars which is why learning to fly with a cheap drone first is a good ...


6

If it were me, there are two different kinds of drones I would want. A tiny whoop and a cinewhoop. Tinywhoop is a loose definition of a very small drone that's about 3 inches wide with guards/ducts around its props and weighing anywhere from 20-50g. They are very durable and fly in places nothing else could. You can assemble them yourself (very easy) or buy ...


6

Throttle scaling is not training wheels so don't feel back about using it. It's never fun to fly a quad with a throttle that is too touchy. Another option is throttle expo which you can turn on in the rates area of Betaflight. Find the hover point for the quad and set that to be the center of your throttle curve. Then add some expo to soften the rate ...


6

I think the Cidora SL5-E is a very good choice. What you need to look for is the "BNF" suffix in the description which stands for "Bind and Fly". In that case a receiver is already built in. On the iflight website you can select this option. If you have the choice, it's best to select the r-xsr because it comes with telemetry. If you are ...


6

I recently started flying myself (Approximately once a week over the past few months) and can recommend a flying wing made out of foam (Expanded Polystyrene (EPP)) with an electric pusher prop and a field with tallish grass (You'll also need around 3 tubes of epoxy, 2 extra propellers, a ladder and/or a pool scoop and in sever cases an axe ;) ). Model ...


5

There are quite a few aspects of FPV, so a I’ll give a summary here. I’ll try to be concise so if any extra info is required or wanted, please let me know. The first thing to look at when you’re flying FPV is the kind of aircraft, all the way up from a small Tiny Whoop to an X class (please not for beginners though!). In general, the larger props tend to ...


5

The first step to getting the right propellers is to figure out what size propellers will fit your drone. What you can do is measure the distance from the center of the motor to the closest thing (probably the frame) that would block the propeller. Multiply that by two, and a few millimeters smaller than that is the maximum prop size/diameter. (smaller props ...


5

I think most people just copy other builds, and step up a size if they burn out any ESCs. If you want to be more scientific you could test one motor with a watt-meter to measure the current draw. Throttle up slowly so you can watch the current build, to protect the ESC you're using for the test. Also check the motor temperature after 30 seconds or so. This ...


5

From what I've seen and experienced, the FlySky FS-i6X (or the i6 version for a little less) is the "gold standard" ultra-budget RC radio. I own two (funny story for some other time), and have no complaints apart from some difficulty fine-tuning failsafe parameters for communication with Betaflight. The radio normally sells for ~$50 USD and is ...


5

While ifconfig is right to recommend the Flysky FS-i6 because it has everything most pilots ever need, I should add that the next step up is only just above your $80 price point. The Taranis QX7 and Jumper T8SG are the bottom end of transmitters that run the open source firmware Open Tx. Because the software is free, you get all the (software) features of a ...


4

You can calculate the rating using one or both of the following equations; just rearrange and/or substitute values as needed: P = I x V Power (Watts) = Current (Amps) x Voltage (Volts) V = I x R Voltage (Volts) = Current (Amps) x Resistance (Ohms) What you want to solve for is current. You can get some or all of the above numbers from the manufacturer’s ...


4

This depends - do you want to fly FPV or LOS, angle or acro? For the LOS angle, I absolutely love the Hubsan X4 H107C. It’s relatively cheap, flies smoothly and is really robust. There is also a version without a camera called the H107L. If you want to fly FPV acro (or angle), the Tinyhawk, Mobula 6 and Meteor 65 (though you may need a throttle cap) are ...


4

For quadrotors, there are simulators for racing drones, such as the DRL one Velocidrone. For camera platform drones you have droneSimPro, Liftoff or DJI's own one. There are loads of them, and the physics engines are all improving in all. A fair few are free or very cheap or have a free version. At the other end of the scale are programs like Phoenix R/C ...


4

Here is my advice for getting started in FPV. Step 1: Get a Radio, Fly a Simulator The first step is to buy a quality radio. Pilots who are used to video game controllers might like a FrSky X-Lite or TBS Tango 2 while others may prefer the FrSky Taranis Q X7. While FrSky radios are the most popular, there are also other great options like the Jumper T16, ...


4

Since no one has answered this question in pretty much a day, I'm gonna spread my half-knowledge now :) I have never heard of a standardized wifi drone control protocol. However, I wouldn't be surprised if both chinese manufacturers inofficially use the same protocol (be it because they have a contract or because they just copy from each other or because ...


4

There are a lot variables when it comes to building your own drone, so there will be a variety of motor sizes and Kvs that will work. I think the recommended motor size for the ZD550 is 3508 (like this motor) but that doesn't mean you can't use something different, like a 2814 motor, because a 2814 is fairly similar in stator volume to a 3508. This answer ...


4

The flight you describe is 100% illegal in the US requiring 107/commercial license + BVLOS waiver. BVLOS waivers are very rare, 61 issued searching the DB for "107.31" here: https://www.faa.gov/uas/commercial_operators/part_107_waivers/waivers_issued/. The rules are similar in most countries. Your budget is off by a zero as well. Depending on ...


3

The comments above are very complete and insightful. In addition to those, I would suggest your first step is to download a drone flight simulator. You can use an XBOX controller to fly it on a PC/Laptop. There are several steps up from there. Connecting goggles to the PC. Connecting an actual RC Transmitter to the PC. Each of these is a step closer to ...


3

I would think one of the stable platforms with obstacle avoidance would work. DJI's newest drones have this feature although you would need to mount a very bright light on the drone for it to be useful in a dark cave. If you're a skilled pilot then I would recommend a very powerful mid-range platform and fit a very bright LED lamp for illumination. The ...


3

For FPV drones you could try FPV Freerider (https://fpv-freerider.itch.io/fpv-freerider). The free version includes only a map and has some limitations about setting rates, but for some training it could do. Unlocking the pro version costs only 4.99$, so it's not a big investment. A nice bonus is the fact that you can pick almost any platform around: Linux, ...


3

That's part of the journey to figure that out! And also part of the fun. There are a lot of different trends in the quad market. I would recommend that you buy a very small and light drone for the beginning. The Whoop class would be perfect. I have a lot of fun with my BetaFpv Meteor65. It can be flown in line-of-sight mode AND in FPV mode. The small size ...


3

There's a couple of things to consider when choosing the right ESC rating for your build in addition to the other answers here. The primary thing is that it is not in-air current draw that typically kills the ESCs in multi-rotors. Static load measurements gained through testing at full throttle on the bench are only reflective of worst-case (or almost) ...


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