4

A larger battery can supply more current, but will only supply as much as the motor and ESC pull from it. Once the battery is large enough to provide the power the motor needs, making it larger won't increase the power - much like increasing the size the fuel tank in a car won't change the engine power. If your motors will only draw 11amps, you don't really ...


3

This is very similar to a project I had in mind, also using an SDR for radio spectrum mapping. Unfortunately there is no ready-made solution to your exact problem, and specifically there are no entirely Pi-based drones that I know of. But we can get pretty close by releasing the constraints a bit. The simplest build would be an autopilot-equipped copter with ...


2

There are a few numbers on the motor, battery and ESC which you should compare to check they are suitable. Your motors have a current requirement (here, 11A) and your ESC must have a higher current rating than this; your 30A is very overrated but would work. The ESC should state its acceptable voltage range - this is usually given as a voltage (e.g. 11-17V) ...


2

You need to be specific about what IMU hardware you are using, like a general purpose IC like MPU6050 (gyro + accelerometer), or flight controllers like Pixhawk, pixRacer, etc .. In Order for you to achieve a fine tuned, linear input-output response, you need to take care of few things firsts and accept some constraints : you cannot fully get rid of ...


1

You might check out this video on using a Pixhawk and a rPi with Python. The video just walks you through the serial connection and some Python code for basic control. The Pixhawk is doing all the real time control (Linux isn't good for that part) and the rPi is talking to it over a serial port. You might also look at the MicroHawk reference in: Do drones ...


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