9

The strength of an electromagnetic signal will attenuate (decrease in strength) over long distances between the receiver and the transmitter due to the inverse square law, but this phenomenon applies equally to all wavelengths/frequencies. The main difference in transmission distance capability between long-range RC systems like TBS Crossfire and FrSky R9M (...


6

There's a few factors that you're missing. The first is that the RC world is dominated by traditional line-of-sight control, and 2.4GHz provides more than enough range to fly a model plane to the limits of vision. There aren't many long range system because few people need them. Even for FPV, long distance flying means a long walk or losing your model when ...


5

The control radio will probably only interfere with the WiFi adapter when it's within a meter or two. Once the drone is flying the signal will be weaker and the error handling should be good enough to handle it. However the opposite is also true. Once flying, any transmissions from the WiFi antenna on the drone will still be really close to your receiver and ...


5

Besides the purely physical considerations listed in ifconfig's answer, there's another reason, and it has nothing to do with frequency, but with how the signal is encoded and decoded. The Crossfire and R9M systems, besides using a lower frequency, also use a piece of hardware called LoRa. This is a chip that allows a far more robust encoding of information ...


4

Well, the first thing I must point out is that these are far from the only frequencies used for that (and yes, I'm aware that you said "most" in the question). The reason I'm doing that is that answering the question "why do some people not use those frequencies?" can give us an insight into why the others do. Let's begin by listing the "at least somewhat ...


4

As is discussed in this Oscar Liang article, FPV hardware exists for all different kinds of frequency bands, stretching from 900 MHz to 5.8 GHz, with 5.8 GHz being the most popular today. People in our hobby have tried nearly everything under the sun. :) Probably the most well-known tradeoff in RF is that between frequency and penetrating power. In general, ...


4

From a strict RF standpoint there will be some interference. This would occur if the RC and Wi-Fi were near the same frequencies, transmitting at the same time, some phase relationship and etc. The worst case would be operating at the extreme end of the range (distance) where one transmitter is driving hard and the other receiver is getting overdriven. This ...


4

No. Radio systems that claim to be "2.4 GHz" don't actually operate on EXACTLY 2.4 GHz. They have different channels a short distance apart. For example, nRF24 transmitters have an active frequency range of 2400 MHz to 2525 MHz, giving it 125 5-MHz channels. Many devices will switch to a different channel if interference is detected.


3

FTDI drivers can be downloaded from the FTDI Website. You should then be able to install the driver using "Update Driver -> Browse my computer for driver software" and selecting the folder containing the extracted files.


3

If you are not interested in hard, real-time control and can accept some autonomy in the drone, then your best choice is satellite communication. The iridium based modules are lightweight, (45 grams), and are easy to integrate (they have USB and Serial connections). One example is RockBlock. You pay per message, and one message (50 bytes) is just about ...


2

The control range depends on the frequency, power and how the transmitter sends the data (the 'mode'.) Power More power gives longer range (much like a brighter light can be seen from further away.) However, as the frequencies are shared there are laws in each country1 which limit the maximum power you can use; this prevents it becoming a 'free for all' ...


2

To my knowledge, the most readily available consumer long-range RC control system is the Crossfire ecosystem from Team BlackSheep. It makes use of the 868 MHz/915 MHz band and supports RF transmission powers from 10 mW to 2000 mW. Under good conditions and given well thought out antenna orientations, TBS Crossfire can achieve some truly ludicrous ranges for ...


2

Wi-Fi and 2.4GHz are not necessarily the same thing. 2.4GHz is part of the ISM band (Industrial, Scientific, Medical) of frequencies that can be used for short range communications. Wi-Fi is a protocol that commonly uses the 2.4GHz spectrum. However 5GHz and 6GHz have been added recently. This protocol is also known as IEEE 802.11 and the term "Wi-Fi&...


2

There are many different currently leading control frequencies, and you can also deviate from these and design your own radios if you'd like to pull specific advantages/disadvantages 2.4 GHz Advantages Higher frequency generally means lower latency link More bandwidth allows for faster data rates More bands means more pilots can fly without interference (...


1

Yes, you look up the communication protocol and the frequency that it's using. If it's unencrypted you can pretty readily hijack it assuming you can over power the transmitter. If it's running off GPS you need to GPS spoof it(not sure how to do this but it's possible). If it's encrypted you probably will only be able to crash it.


1

As I understand it, it is a case of available bandwidth, range, and also legislation. 5.8GHz is able to transfer much more information on its carrier wave due to its higher frequency compared to on 2.4GHz. The reason, therefore, that we use 2.4GHz for a control link and 5.8GHz for FPV is that FPV requires more information; we have to create whole images, ...


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