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6

There has been a good deal of discussion on this topic, and it has been no small source of conflict between several of the main firmware players in the high-performance DIY drone flight controller world. The short version is that based on evidence gathered from flight recorder logs, the ICM series gyros are more sensitive to electrical and mechanical noise ...


6

It's not superior, it's just good enough, cheap enough and may be more noise resistant than ICM20602. There's a bunch of flight controllers with dual IMUs onboard. For example, Lumenier Lux F7 has MPU6000 and ICM20602, you can choose which one to use. SP Racing F7 and H7 series use two ICM20602s fused together. Also, there's BrainFPV Radix which uses ...


6

There is actually no such thing as a 6-axis gyro; the correct term for this is "IMU", which stands for "Inertial Measurement Unit". An IMU is a device that combines several inertial sensors that measure the craft's orientation and position in space. The 6-axis IMU is a composite sensor, which contains two different types of 3-axis sensors on one chip. ...


4

TL;DR: The configurable scale ranges for the accelerometer, gyroscope, and magnetometer on the MPU-9250 IMU affect the maximum resolution and range of the reported values. As you increase the full-scale range setting, the maximum value/rate that can be reported by the IMU before the IMU is saturated increases, but the resolution of the value/rate decreases. ...


4

A three-axis gyro measures the speed of rotation in three-axis - pitch, roll, and yaw. A six-axis gyro is a slight misnomer, as it is a three-axis gyro with a three-axis accelerometer, which measures acceleration in three axes (x, y, and z). As it can measure the acceleration from gravity, these sensors can be used to determine which way is down relative to ...


3

This is the best damned reference on rotations: Representing Attitude: Euler Angles, Unit Quaternions, and Rotation by James Diebel of Stanford University (dated 2006-10-20). You didn't specify, but you're almost certainly using the Tait-Bryan convention-- which is first yaw, then pitch, then roll-- for rotation axes. You're also possibly using NED for ...


3

The full scale range is the largest value that the sensor can report; this is usually a balance of sensitivity to word length. If you have 8 bits to report the value, how many deg/s do you make one bit? The more deg/s you use per bit, you can report a bigger full-scale value but you loose sensitivity as the minimum change reported increases. As an example, ...


2

You need to be specific about what IMU hardware you are using, like a general purpose IC like MPU6050 (gyro + accelerometer), or flight controllers like Pixhawk, pixRacer, etc .. In Order for you to achieve a fine tuned, linear input-output response, you need to take care of few things firsts and accept some constraints : you cannot fully get rid of ...


1

A large change in acceleration doesn't necessarily mean a big change in velocity. Since the chance in velocity is the integral of the acceleration, the velocity will barely change if the acceleration spikes quickly for example. Something that I don't quite understand is why the two graphs doesn't match. By definition, the acceleration should be negative when ...


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