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10

When choosing an FPV camera, there are several things that you need to look out for: Sensor Technology Most modern FPV cameras use a CMOS sensor. These are digital sensors that generally tend to have a higher resolution (measured in TVL or TeleVision Lines) than the alternative, which is CCD analogue sensors. Pretty much every modern FPV camera uses CMOS ...


7

A major consideration is weight reduction; if material can be removed without significantly reducing the strength of the item, this will result in an increased payload or flight duration. This is particularly evident in the motor arms of the product you linked, as the triangular shapes are renowned for their relative strength. Another advantage of this is ...


5

There isn't an easy solution, because this isn't a common thing to do. The main issue is that real-time control for FPV requires very little lag. Wifi requires several layers of processing, on a computer where it has to compete with other processes for processor time. Your video needs to be encoded and compressed, and still work if some data is missing. Most ...


4

Most multicopters use ESCs that do not have a BEC, which saves space and weight (and the red wire). Instead they use a single BEC, usually built into a power distribution board (PDB) that can be stacked under the flight controller. It's also increasingly common to integrate 4 ESCs and the BEC on one board, replacing the PDB. If you have ESCs with built-in ...


4

The exact wiring architecture will differ between flight controllers, but (if the BEC is used at all for board power) it's likely that only one BEC is actively used to power the FC. The others would just be open circuits, i.e. disconnected and unused. As a general rule in circuit design, it's not a wise idea to combine different power sources/rails unless ...


4

As you point out, the Teensy 4.0 online documentation mentions that neither the digital GPIO nor analog I/O are 5v-tolerant pins. It appears that the ESCs in the kit you linked to only have a PWM signal input and no bi-directional communication bus (e.g. Bidirectional DSHOT), so the only voltage present on the PWM input line would be one that you create. (...


3

The loose nuts that you hear may be the prop nuts. If this is the case, the props are not held down with enough force and so will be slipping, not providing the torque or the RPM to be able to lift the drone. I would suggest tightening all of the prop nuts and all of the frame fixings and seeing if the issue persists.


3

Not very useful. If you're designing at the absolute limit of what a frame can handle, such that it's as light as possible, then maybe you'll want to know the maximum torque, but you should be designing for orders of magnitude more strength than that (It's not hard, small BLDC motors aren't very torquey). There are control algorithms that take into account ...


3

I doubt you can grab something off the shelf that can help you with your use case. In any case you will need to put your sensors and payload onboard and set up the logging and data transmission by yourself so it makes sense to DIY stuff to cater to your requirements properly. For your use case, I think you should look into a 9inch or larger ArduPilot/PX4 ...


2

This has all of the items needed to build a drone. Flight Controller Remote Control and Receiver Frame Motors - 4 Electronic Speed Controllers - 4 Propellers - 2 CW, 2 CCW Assemble it and you will need a battery to fly it. Looking forward to seeing how it turns out!


2

Contrary to the previous answers, on a traditional flight controller (taking the KK2 board as an example), all 4 BECs can be connected together if the user blindly wires it that way. Whether this is recommended practice is below. Traditional ESCs (before blheli was a thing) use a 7805 linear voltage regulator as a BEC. A lot of ESCs (the fire red series, and ...


2

Building your own radio system is a good exercise for understanding and appreciating the technology, but always remember to include a failsafe. Regarding swapping modules, it looks like you are using the 432MHz modules which use On/Off Keying (OOK.) The work essentially by sending the state of a digital line, and support some serial formats like UART but ...


2

I found this plan online, which might be similar to what you want. The wingspan is about right, it uses a Rogallo wing and the text in the bottom-right suggests it was in a magazine called the "American Aircraft Modeler", if that rings any bells? (Your profile indicates America, so it sounded promising.)


2

I'll start by warning that you may have misconceptions that are leading you in the wrong direction. The reason that FPV screens built into transmitters are not more popular is that screens aren't bright enough to compete with sunlight. The primary function of goggles is to cut out bright reflections, so you can see the picture. Also, transmitters are ...


2

You can certainly use a PID based design and tune it from there. This design is simple enough that if you just have XYZ PID controllers and proper output mixing it should work just fine. I'd recommend doing something similar to his design where the motors are far from the center of mass which will increase the torque generated by tilting the motors. Good ...


1

The torque a brushless motor is capable of producing is particularly important when dealing with control loops. The torque is directly proportional to the rate of change of RPMs, which is directly proportional (though non-linear) to thrust. How quickly the motor-prop combination can make adjustments has a massive impact on overall stability. That may or may ...


1

I am a fan of "More information is better". I believe that torque can be used to calculate system efficiency. I just do not know what those calculations are. I have seen one commercial thrust stand like your concept/design that includes one or two load cells that measure torque. I do not believe that measuring torque would be included in that ...


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