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A standard brushed motor has a positive, negative and a commutator that switches the polarity of the rotor. Conversely, a brushless motor has a multiple of three sets of coils. These coils are energized in a particular order to create a series of electromagnetic forces that ‘pull’ the bell (which contains permanent magnets) around. As there are three sets ...


14

Brushless motors (aka BLDC) are typically[*] more efficient than brushed DC motors. Higher efficiency equates to longer flight times for a same battery pack. Amongst other reasons: The inrush current at the moment of commutation can involve sparks (which is an inefficient waste of energy), and in any case is a free-running operation without the possibility ...


8

TL;DR: Brushed DC motors have two wires because they require DC current (+VCC and Ground), while brushless motors require more complex driving circuitry which controls the AC current required to drive them. Despite sometimes looking similar on the outside, the functional principles of brushed DC motors and brushless DC motors (aka. BLDC motors) are quite ...


6

As someone who loves collecting data for analysis, I do track all of my flights. I have found that, under normal conditions, brushed motors should last for at least a few hundred flights. You can get higher if you don't fly hard or get things caught in the props or motor shaft that will make the motor heat up more than normal. How to determine whether a ...


4

Brushless motors are typically CNC machined for a large part of their manufacturing process. The top part of the bell and bearing race are machined from aluminum. The shafts typically steel or a titanium alloy and are CNC machined in a lathe. The steel flux ring is typically pressed, and the stators are stamped from existing templates for the most part. The ...


3

That sounds like you don't have a flight controller. You won't be able to fly a quadcopter without electronic stabilisation of some sort. The basic configuration is not naturally stable. An analogy is trying to balance a stick vertically on its end. You need some kind of active control to keep it balanced, and shorter sticks need faster reflexes. Most people ...


3

The difference between outrunner and inrunner BLDC (brushless DC) motors is that an outrunner's rotor is outside the stator while an inrunner's rotor is inside the stator. (cit.) In general, outrunners have more torque and rotate slower than inrunners, which usually have less torque and rotate significantly quicker. The two different designs are possible ...


3

There are multiple reasons. Firstly, here is what I have been able to source: https://www.popularmechanics.com/home/tools/a8109/whats-so-great-about-brushless-motor-power-tools/ In this article, you can see that the addition of brushes causes friction and an extra voltage drop. This means more power is used for the same amount of work, so the battery will ...


3

On a brushed motor, the permanent magnets are on the outside (stator) and the electromagnets are inside (on the rotor.) The coils are connected to the supply voltage by the eponymous brushes, which slide against the rotor to contact different ends of the windings as they go past, changing the direction of the magnetic field. This generates friction and ...


2

Look for performance issues. A lot of signs of failing motors are visible, such as if the drone falls out of the air or the motors sometimes foal so start. If none of these signs are present, most likely the motors don’t need replacing.


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