6

The main things you need are a motor, battery, electronic speed controller (ESC) and servos. The ESC sits between the battery and motor, and it also has a thinner cable that goes to the receiver. The wires from ESCs are often labelled, but if not, there will be two big wires on one end that are the input from the battery (red for positive, black for negative)...


5

Aside from quality control issues with the product, the only real way to destroy an ESC faster than the effects or normal wear and tear (minimal) is to mistreat it: Using it with a voltage higher than its rating Using it with a motor that's dramatically too large Drawing more current than its rating Frequently stalling the motor against tree branches or ...


5

There are quite a few aspects of FPV, so a I’ll give a summary here. I’ll try to be concise so if any extra info is required or wanted, please let me know. The first thing to look at when you’re flying FPV is the kind of aircraft, all the way up from a small Tiny Whoop to an X class (please not for beginners though!). In general, the larger props tend to ...


4

There's no single 'best' starter drone, as new ones are released every few months. However there are lots of good options under \$30, and some as cheap as $15. What you're looking for is something small and light, so you can fly it indoors without breaking things. It should have rings around the props to protect them and anything it hits. Syma, Eachine and ...


4

Here is my advice for getting started in FPV. Step 1: Get a Radio, Fly a Simulator The first step is to buy a quality radio. Pilots who are used to video game controllers might like a FrSky X-Lite or TBS Tango 2 while others may prefer the FrSky Taranis Q X7. While FrSky radios are the most popular, there are also other great options like the Jumper T16, ...


3

Summary The necessary electronic components: Transmitter & receiver, ESC, motor, servos. (yes, it really is that simple) How they are linked together: basically; battery plugs into ESC input, ESC plugs into receiver, servos plug into receiver, and motor plugs into the ESC output. Detailed explanation The construction of a fixed wing can be fairly ...


3

The image below shows a fairly basic fixed wing electronic configuration. Depending on your design you might not need it all, and for more complicated builds with flaps and retractable gear you would want more, but I think it is a good overview. For the most part, you should not need to solder; most hobby electronics comes with common connectors pre-fitted ...


3

The comments above are very complete and insightful. In addition to those, I would suggest your first step is to download a drone flight simulator. You can use an XBOX controller to fly it on a PC/Laptop. There are several steps up from there. Connecting goggles to the PC. Connecting an actual RC Transmitter to the PC. Each of these is a step closer to ...


2

ESCs usually last for ages. I still use the ones I bought when brushless motors were relatively new, 15+ years ago. That said, if you buy the absolute cheapest they do occasionally just die for no reason. If you buy that pack of 4 (presumably the yellow 30amp ones Banggood sell for $15) I wouldn't be surprised if one dies quite soon and the others last for ...


1

Yes, ESCs are semi-disposable. I smoked 3 before I flew my first flight. I buy esc's in groups of 5 (same for motors - I fly quads) then I have a spare for failure. Been using that pattern for 5+ years. ESC's stop failing when: You learn how to build like a bawce (10-15 clean builds or more) You have the right ESC and stop shopping based on price and ...


1

My experience with cheap drones (<=30€) is very bad. These drones are nothing compared to either DJI or an FPV drone. I say it as it is. And I'm usually the guy who saves on every penny possible. I've had a Revell Nano Hex and a Carrera drone, each around 30€. Both are completely unable to hold their position or anything. These drones just end up ...


1

Extra comment... A big part of the pleasure of fpv flying is having quality parts. If you have cheap electronics, goggles, motors, camera... The shortcomings compound into an experience that is nothing like what you were looking for. 'You get what you pay for' is more the case in this situation and if you go too low you will lose interest and your drone will ...


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