20

You should dispose of them. A LiPo battery has three parts: the anode (negative plate), the cathode (positive plate), and electrolyte (sandwiched in between the two plates). Electricity is formed by electrons moving from the cathode to the anode through the electrolyte (which helps the electrons flow). The electrolyte decomposes over time, which results in ...


12

The risk of a puffy battery exploding during storage is still comparatively low, you shouldn't underestimate it however. During charging the risk of explosion is at its peak. This is also the reason why you charge your batteries slower than you discharge them (i.e. to lower the risk of puffing and explosions, as well as to keep wear and tear low). During use,...


10

The most appropriate answer I could find comes from this study which states that a charged LiPo should be returned to storage charge if you do t plan to use it within the next 12 hours, and leaving it longer will cause a buildup of damage. The study is very interesting, though it may not explicitly answer your question I recommend giving it a read.


9

The short answer is that you don't want to run batteries below 3.0V ever, and ideally want to avoid large current draw below 3.5V. For a 3S battery, once you start seeing voltages in single digits (3.33V/cell is 10V, below that), it's time to land as a quick reference point - although you can set more precise values of around 10.6V as the warning point ...


9

Only parallel-charge batteries with the same number of cells. Safe parallel charging requires that the voltages on individual cells be close to each other. A difference of 0.1V per cell is considered to be the maximum safe difference (I found it online, and have used ever since, although I have no scientific proof of that). One way to compare the packs ...


8

I start my landing approach when the average cell voltage reaches below 3.5V on a stable flight (not counting voltage dips on short, aggressive maneuvers). At that point, you should still have enough authority to land safely. You can go somewhat lower without damaging the cells, but at that point, the voltage curve starts to be very steep and it is ...


8

"Puffed" batteries are both more and less dangerous. I am drawing from over 10,000 FPV flights where I beat the mortal sh*t out of lipos and also from over 3000 battery charges I have logged and analyzed (I built an app for that). I read the other comment and that person knows their chemistry. I will try to balance that information with real world ...


8

Charging Lithium batteries is a far more delicate process than discharging them because of the complex chemical processes involved. Batteries that are rated for tens of "c"s of discharge rate are usually only rated for 1-2 "c"s of charging rate. Standard charging rates are 1c for regular speed and 2c for fast charging, with 2c damaging the battery more. C-...


7

Connecting the batteries in series or parallel brings two new issues with it that you need to consider before you start using them and they are both related to batteries that are not on the same charge level. If you put two batteries of a different charge in parallel, the battery with the highest charge will charge the other one and very high currents can ...


7

Yes, you can. The primary difference between LiHV and LiPo batteries is the ability to change them to ~4.35 V/cell instead of 4.20 V/cell with a nominal cell voltage of 3.8 V instead of 3.7 V. Just like how there's nothing stopping you from only charging your LiPos to 4.1 V/cell instead of their rated full charge @ 4.20 V/cell, there's nothing wrong with ...


7

I have found that landing based on voltage is inaccurate. For example, if you look at the voltage in the OSD while you have the stick at full throttle, the Voltage will be lower than if you had it at half throttle. So, do you land any time full throttle goes down to 3.2V/cell, or when you are at half throttle and 3.2V/cell? Instead of relying on voltage ...


6

Like the other answer, I couldn't find a specific, good study to go off of for any sort of real statement. The ones I have seen tend to be pretty low sample sizes and somewhat limited scope. What I did find that supported some experimental data directed at the type of lipos that get used for quadcopters was this: https://www.propwashed.com/lipo-storage-...


6

You definitely can charge your 1205 mAh 6S LiPo at a current higher than 0.5A. For most of the LiPos we use on drones, the recommended charge rate is 1C, which for your battery, would be about 1.2Amps. (A 1C charge rate is 1 Amp for every 1000mAh) A 1C charge rate is a good middle ground, but you can use a lower charge rate (~0.5C) for safer but slower ...


5

All LiPo batteries face a process called electrolyte decomposition. This means that all LiPo batteries will produce oxygen, some carbon dioxide, and some carbon monoxide through normal use. This process, however, is greatly sped up when certain things happen to a LiPo. These are the things that will cause noticeable "puffiness" in LiPo batteries: Over-...


5

This question seems to be quite the debate in many places. However, the general consensus falls between 3.7 and 3.85v per cell. You can find a similar inquiry here: Storing at 3.7 or 3.85v and here: LiPo storage voltage It seems that generally, the difference between storage charging to 3.7v, 3.8v, or 3.85v is negligible for most people. However, I would ...


5

The typical temperatures experienced across Europe shouldn't be a problem for LiPo storage; although depending on exactly where you are you may also want to check out this question: Do low temperatures damage LiPo batteries? If your storage location may be subject to direct sun then this could cause extra heating which may be harmful - think of a dark ...


4

My personal strategy is to use both voltage and mah as guides. For a 1300mah battery, I'll fly around and if I notice I've used up 1000mah I'll come in and land. However, if I'm flying around and I notice my voltage osd warning blink is happening more and more often during even nominal throttle use I'll come in and land. In the latter case, the battery is ...


4

Yes, voltage sag is perfectly normal and safe for the battery, so long as it remains above the recommended minimum voltage levels. The C rating is important as the construction of a cell affects how quickly it can provide current. The internal surface area of the positive and negative terminals is related to the current it can provide - a larger surface ...


4

You want to keep the battery voltage above 3.2 volts per cell (so 12.8V for a 4S pack) to maximise the lifespan of the battery. Remember that's the voltage once you've landed; you'll need to plan to land before this point.


4

I think that puffing is generally a result of overheating, or over-discharging. As you say, drones push their batteries hard. They can use a battery in 5 minutes and can draw very high current peaks during that flight. By comparison, a phone or laptop battery typically lasts several hours. Similarly drones generally allow you to over-discharge. Discharging ...


3

Parallel charging is awesome and can be done safely, but to do this it's important to understand what's going on. First and foremost, of course, you can only parallel connect packs with the same number of cells! If you connect packs with differing numbers of cells, the higher cell count pack will immediately overcharge the smaller pack, and there will be ...


3

Use a dedicated parallel charging board, and charge only batteries with approximately the same voltage (difference less than 0.1V / cell). It should be okay to charge batteries of different C-rating and capacity as long as the cell count is the same, but to be safe you might want to only charge batteries with the same capacity in parallel. Source: https://...


3

Will the batteries deteriorate? Yes. Will they deteriorate significantly? probably not. Generally, LiPos are best kept in cooler temperatures and being stored in hot places can harm the battery cells. However, with the temperatures you gave, the deterioration should be minimal and it is definitely better to have the batteries deteriorate a little than to ...


3

The only thing I know that could damage the battery is extreme temperatures, and based on what you said I think that those temperatures are okay. The difference in temperature between day and night shouldn't matter at all, since it is both a small and relatively slow change. I tried searching for some more information about this, but I couldn't find any ...


3

Yes. When we talk about a multi-cell battery like a 4s battery, what we're actually talking about is a collection of cells are connected in series. If you were to disassemble a 4s battery and the proposed dual 2s battery, the result would be very similar; 4 3000mah 1s LiPo cells, all wired together in series. The only real difference is that between cells 2 ...


3

Using two 2s batteries should work just fine. Just make sure that the connecter you buy is a series connecter in order to get the 4s voltage. (series = added voltage, parallel = added capacity). And this isn't a big deal, but buying a 4s battery to use might be easier than attaching two 2s batteries in series every time you want to use your goggles.


3

According to this source, yes you can charge both 1s and 2s batteries at the same time. This is because, like you mentioned, there are separate charge controllers. You can also choose whether you want them to charge to 4.2v or 4.35v per cell.


3

If you use a BEC you get a few advantages: Input voltage doesn't matter (usually it has to be at least a few Volts above the output voltage), you can probably use the LiPo you already have. The servos have constant power, which would otherwise drop off as the voltage get's lower. If you use the original radio and receiver the range might also drop as the ...


2

A LiPo battery should be charged at a maximum rate of 1C, where 'C' is the capacity of the battery in amp hours divided by hours - so a 2200mAh battery can be safely charged at 2200mA (i.e. 2.2A.) For some high performance batteries the manufacturer may also state a charge C rating above 1C (such as some Turnigy Graphene batteries), but if this is not given ...


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